A personal mission for families in need

A personal mission for families in need


My nephew was born with Congenital Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia, a rare form of arrhythmia. He was in and out of the hospital frequently, for the first year of his life. Thereafter, there were numerous visits to doctors and therapists for continued treatments. It was a very difficult time for my nephew’s parents and extended family because we didn’t know whether he would survive.

My sister and brother-in-law’s pain and distress was heartbreaking. My nephew’s serious illness also created huge financial consequences. My sister and her family lost their home through foreclosure, the baby’s medical bills piled up, and creditors and bill collectors called regularly.

My nephew is now 5 years old. He’s a fantastic, rambunctious, adorable little guy. You would never know that he has a heart condition and wears a pacemaker in his tummy.

Thanks to Children’s Hospital in Dallas, my sister and her family were able to experience the joy of Christmas during harsh times. The hospital has a special program where truly needy families are chosen by the hospital’s social workers to submit holiday wish lists. The hospital also has a program which permits families to “adopt” a family in need. The adopted family provides a Holiday wish list and information about the sick child and family.  Because of this special program, my sister and her family were able to have a brighter holiday. They were given basic necessities that they could not afford at the time.

As a result of the love and generosity of others, my sister and her family were able to move forward. Although my sister has not been able to return to work and has to closely watch expenses, she and her husband adopt a family each Christmas. They are determined to give all that they can to help others who are in their shoes. After witnessing my sister’s experience and the kindness and generosity of persons who remain anonymous, my husband and I annually contribute to the holiday adoption program.

This past holiday, my husband and I “adopted” a grandma with two young granddaughters. The parents of the children simply were not involved.  One child has a brain tumor and requires regular chemotherapy. The grandmother, who lives in a garage apartment, makes a meager living. Yet, the only items that the grandma had on her wish list were laundry detergent, queen size bed sheets, and a purse for herself. Her granddaughters, likewise, only had short wish lists. They could have asked for so much more but did not want anyone to feel that they were a bother.

Although we wished to help our adopted family throughout the year, the hospital’s program was anonymous and only occurred during the Christmas holiday season. However, we could not get the family out of our minds. Consequently, we determined to create an organization to assist families with seriously ill children year ‘round because their emotional and financial needs continue far beyond the Holiday season. Why should there be seasonal limitations to helping families who are in dire need? With the help and contributions of our supporters, MyPocketChange will provide basic necessities throughout the year to families in economic distress and help alleviate some of their burdens.

Projected poverty impacts of COVID-19 (coronavirus)

Projected poverty impacts of COVID-19 (coronavirus)


Poverty projections suggest that the social and economic impacts of the crisis are likely to be quite significant. Estimates based on growth projections from the June 2020 Global Economic Prospects report show that, when compared with pre-crisis forecasts, COVID-19 could push 71 million people into extreme poverty in 2020 under the baseline scenario and 100 million under the downside scenario. As a result, the global extreme poverty rate would increase from 8.23% in 2019 to 8.82% under the baseline scenario or 9.18% under the downside scenario, representing the first increase in global extreme poverty since 1998, effectively wiping out progress made since 2017. While a small decline in poverty is expected in 2021 under the baseline scenario, projected impacts are likely to be long-lasting.

The number of people living under the international poverty lines for lower and upper middle-income countries – $3.20/day and $5.50/day in 2011 PPP, respectively – is also projected to increase significantly, signaling that social and economic impacts will be widely felt. Cont…

How COVID-19 Is Impacting People Experiencing Homelessness

How COVID-19 Is Impacting People Experiencing Homelessness


To combat the spread of COVID-19, physical distancing measures are being instituted around the world. But for those experiencing homelessness and insecure housing, safety measures are not only out of reach, they’re not an option.

While the burden of disease in society has never been equal, people experiencing homelessness during the pandemic are paying an especially high price. With social services stretched thin and businesses shuttering, rather than keeping people away from shelters, the virus has driven many in. Once there, they’re met with perfect conditions for the rapid spread of the coronavirus: overcrowded and sometimes unsanitary conditions, surrounded by others who have come in contact with hundreds of people prior to entry, with the added risk of pre-existing conditions. Cont…

COVID-19 and the Impact on the Homeless Population

COVID-19 and the Impact on the Homeless Population


To address and combat the quickly spreading COVID-19 crisis, state and local governments across the United States have issued strict social and physical distancing orders. Although these recommendations have been taken seriously by most, those experiencing homelessness and housing insecurity are unfortunately unable to follow these safety measures, making this population more vulnerable to contracting the virus.

People experiencing homelessness during today’s pandemic are paying an especially high price, with businesses slowly reopening and social services spread extremely thin. Global Citizen explains that the coronavirus pandemic has driven many people off the streets and into shelters, in which they are met with the perfect conditions for the rapid spread of the virus: overcrowded and sometimes unsanitary conditions, surrounded by others who have come in contact with hundreds of people prior to entry, with the added risk of pre-existing conditions. Cont…

COVID-19 is ‘a crisis within a crisis’ for homeless people

COVID-19 is ‘a crisis within a crisis’ for homeless people


PHOENIX (AP) — Nearly 200 tents stand inches apart on the scorching gravel lots, many covered in blankets for an extra layer of relief from the desert sun. Outside, their occupants sit on hot ground or in folding chairs, nearby palm trees providing no shade. Despite 12-foot-square sections painted in the gravel, there is little social distancing for Phoenix’s homeless population.

Created by local officials in late April as a temporary solution for some of the estimated 3,700 unsheltered homeless, the fenced-in lots on the edge of downtown promised round-the-clock security, social distancing and access to water and toilets. But residents complain that hygiene supplies have become scarce, and measures meant to contain the spread of COVID-19 are not enforced. Cont…

Human Development Index

Human Development Index